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Tranquillityite Chalconatronite
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Nanoparticles Disambiguater
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Margaritasite Pyromorphite
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Aquamarines Semiprecious
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Radiocarbon Fluorescence
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Tranquillityite is silicate mineral mostly composed of iron, oxygen, silicon, zirconium and titanium with smaller fractions of yttrium and calcium. It is named after the Mare Tranquillitatis (Sea of Tranquility), the place on the Moon from which the rock samples in which it was found were brought during the Apollo 11 mission in 1969. Until its discovery in Australia in 2011, it was the last mineral brought from the Moon which was thought to be unique, with no terrestrial counterpart. In 1970, material scientists found a new unnamed Fe, Ti, Zr- silicate mineral containing rare-earths and Y in a lunar rock sample: #10047.
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Chalconatronite is a carbonate mineral and rare secondary copper mineral that contains copper, sodium, carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. Chalconatronite is partially soluble in water, and only decomposes, although chalconatronite is soluble while cold, in dilute acids. The name comes from the mineral's compounds, copper ("chalcos" in Greek) and natron, naturally forming sodium carbonate. The mineral is thought to be formed by water carrying alkali carbonates (possibly from soil eacting with bronze. Similar minerals include malachite, azurite, and other copper carbonates. Most chalconatronite formed on bronze & silver have been treated with sodium sesquicarbonate or sodium cyanide.
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Minerals are classified by variety, species, series and group, in order of increasing generality. The basic level of definition is that of mineral species, each distinguished from the others by unique chemical and physical properties. For example, quartz is defined by its formula, SiO2, and a specific crystalline structure that distinguishes it from other minerals with the same chemical formula. When a range of composition between two minerals species exists, a mineral series is defined. The biotite series is represented by variable amounts of the endmembers phlogopite, siderophyllite, annite, and eastonite.
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Chemistry and crystal structure together define a mineral. With a restriction to 32 point groups, minerals of different chemistry may have identical crystal structure. For example, halite, galena, and periclase all belong to the hexaoctahedral point group, as they have a similar stoichiometry between their different constituent elements. In contrast, polymorphs are groupings of minerals that share a chemical formula but have a different structure. For example, pyrite and marcasite are both iron sulfides; the former is isometric while the latter is orthorhombic. This polymorphism extends to all sulfides with the generic AX2 formula.
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The major examples of these are quartz, the feldspars, the micas, the amphiboles, the pyroxenes, the olivines, and calcite; except for the last one, all of these minerals are silicates. Overall, around 150 minerals are considered particularly important, whether in terms of their abundance or aesthetic value in terms of collecting. Commercially valuable minerals and rocks are referred to as industrial minerals. For example, muscovite, a white mica, can be used for windows (referred to as isinglass), as a filler, or insulator. Ores are minerals that have a high concentration of a certain element.
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Crystal structure results from the geometric spatial arrangement of atoms in the internal structure of a mineral. This crystal structure is based on internal atomic or ionic arrangement that is often expressed in the geometric form that the crystal takes. Even when the mineral grains are too small to see, the underlying crystal structure is always periodic and can be determined by X-ray diffraction.Minerals are typically described by their symmetry content. Crystals are restricted to 32 point groups, which differ by symmetry. Groups are classified into broad categories, encompassing the six crystal families.
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Minerals are not equivalent to rocks. A rock is an aggregate of one or more minerals or mineraloids. Limestone or quartzite, are composed primarily of one mineral—calcite or aragonite in the case of limestone, and quartz in the latter case. Other rocks can be defined by abundances of minerals; a granite is defined by proportions of quartz, alkali feldspar, and plagioclase feldspar. Rocks are composed entirely of non-mineral material; coal is a sedimentary rock composed primarily of carbon. In rocks, some mineral species and groups are more abundant than others.
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Classifying minerals ranges from simple to difficult. A mineral can be identified by several properties, some being sufficient for full identification without equivocation. In other cases, minerals can only be classified by more complex optical, chemical or X-ray diffraction analysis; these methods, however, can be costly and time-consuming. Physical properties applied for classification include crystal structure and habit, hardness, lustre, diaphaneity, colour, streak, cleavage and fracture, and specific gravity. Some other less general tests include fluorescence & phosphorescence.

About Ogg Text

Ogg Text is the complimentary textface of Ogg, the seminal display serif by Lucas Sharp inspired by the hand lettering of 20th century book designer and calligrapher Oscar Ogg. Ogg Text infuses the signature calligraphic styling of its predecessor with new and old transitional and oldstyle textface models.

5 weights, 10 total fonts.

Ogg Text Construction

In late 2017, we began the first prototypes of Ogg Text. Adapting the strange and irreverent Ogg (display) original into something useful for long-form reading was no small task. While its intricate details, interconnected letterforms, 24° italic angle, and swash italic capitals would prove to be difficult attributes to translate into text, there were many moments in the roman that were well suited to this adaptation. We also wanted to capture the beautiful hierarchy he achieved with his book jacket designs, where extravagant, high-contrast display titles would give way to beautifully legible sub-headers and captions.

Ogg Superfam 2up r

The transitional stroke ductus of Ogg roman made for maximum legibility with an extremely compact word-shape, even when set at  8pt and below. In this vein, Ogg Text came to take on an unmistakably Dutch flavor, given its emphasis on the calligraphic underpinnings of the letterforms, and was no doubt informed by the process of drawing an entire Bram De Does inspired Old Style text face the year before.

Ogg Amnethyst diagram

The multiple serif constructions of the roman lowercase stems proved to be unique devices for letter differentiation. While many of the original constructions served as uniquely functional devices for text optimization, other forms were changed completely, adapting to their new format in novel ways that maintained the character of the family while providing functionality at smaller sizes. The "y" descender above is a good example of this.

New Ogg R R diagram (B and W paper)

Adapting the italic from the original display to text was a much more daunting task. The 24° italic angle of the display original was first brought to a more manageable 18°, still a remarkably steep angle for a text typeface. After many months of wrestling with the 18° italic design, (pictured below) we eventually scrapped it in favor of a new Italic design.

Ogg Text Italic Diagram

The final italic design has a 14° italic angle and less angular bowl-to-stem joins. These changes provided improved legibility and rasterization at small sizes, and were necessary for manually hinted webfonts. Subtle references to the swashy flavor of the original display italic can be found in the text, such as the top serif of the uppercase "A". There are also subtle nods to Oscar Ogg’s caption lettering found throughout. In the future we are hoping to release a build that will include this current 14° version, as well as the 18° version which will also include a text adaptation of Ogg’s signature italic swash capitals.

Ogg Super Optical size Poster

The new Ogg superfamily is a bold type system that finds cohesion in wildly different typographic forms and genres. The family tracks the progression of its designer, from his early days exploring the irreverent imperfectionism of the original display, to the unexpected functionality and studied execution of the text. The superfamily is an amalgam of disparate references and ideation, both an inventive homage to one of the great underappreciated lettering artists of the 20th century, and a new take on the calligraphic text face.

Ogg Text Badge

Designed by Lucas Sharp in 2019 with Connor Davenport, Wei Huang, and Kia Tasbihgou.

Ogg Text was hinted by Noe Blanco


Version History:
V.1.101 Nov 2013

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